Sunday, January 3, 2016

Pork Shoulder/pork butt Jerk style

I'm starting the New Year with some new recipes.  Today's recipe is using a part of the pig, the shoulder or butt as it is sometimes referred to that I cut cut into large cubes.  It was about a 2 lb. piece.



After reading about this cut  of pork I decided to try it in my crockpot on low. Check link below highlighted in blue as Pork.



Ingredients:
2 lb. pork butt cut in large pieces/cubes
1 large sweet onion cut in medium pieces or quartered
1 large green pepper sliced in medium pieces
Jerk seasoning(I used a package of seasoning) since this is a first try.

Note:  Next time I'm going to try the below recipe and cook it on top of the stove, adding the peppers and onions after the meat has browned nicely.  Simmering it slowly on top while adding about 1/2 to 3/4 cup of water.  

If you still want to do it in the crockpot you can.  After browning the pork in oil, place all seasoned pork in crockpot with 1/2 cup water.  Cook on low around 7 hours or as I did 4 hours on high.  I would not add the peppers or onions at the same time as the pork as I felt they became to mushy which I don't particularly care for.  Add the peppers separately in the meal before serving. 

This is the way it looked before placing all in the crockpot.


Note:  Suggestions saute, peppers and onions separately and add to pork at the very end.  That is if you like them with a slight crispness. 

I served this dish as a meal over rice with a side salad.  This dish is a little spicy so just adjust the amount of cayenne pepper to your liking. Enjoy!


MY next seasoning I will try is from the All recipes site.  It's all an natural seasoning recipe


Rub:

    1. In a small bowl, stir together the dried onion, thyme,
    2.  allspice, ground black pepper, cinnamon, cayenne pepper, and salt. Coat meat lightly with oil, then rub seasoning onto meat.  Bake or use your crockpot.


    Pork
     http://modernfarmer.com/2014/03/pork-101/

    Starting from the front of the pig: Pork shoulder (also called pork butt or “Boston butt”) is generally sold as a 5 to 10 pound boneless roast at the grocery store. (Pork shoulder chops are sold with bones, but those are less common.)
    How to Cook: “It’s a really great thing to roast,” says Mylan. It’s a relatively tough cut, well layered with fat, and is good for braising, slow and low roasting or barbecue. “Shoulders are good for when you’re going to cook for a long period of time and want it to stay moist,” he says. A typical preparation? Pulled pork.
    Side note: Why is this cut sometimes called “pork butt” when it doesn’t come from the actual rear end?Pork
    Starting from the front of the pig: Pork shoulder (also called pork butt or “Boston butt”) is generally sold as a 5 to 10 pound boneless roast at the grocery store. (Pork shoulder chops are sold with bones, but those are less common.)
    How to Cook: “It’s a really great thing to roast,” says Mylan. It’s a relatively tough cut, well layered with fat, and is good for braising, slow and low roasting or barbecue. “Shoulders are good for when you’re going to cook for a long period of time and want it to stay moist,” he says. A typical preparation? Pulled pork.
    Side note: Why is this cut sometimes called “pork butt” when it doesn’t come from the actual rear end?

    Post a Comment